January 02, 2007

Breadcrumb: Allies in the enemy camp

Pop quiz: did the Egyptians believe in the Israelite God? Apparently, at least some of them believed in his power. By the time of the seventh plague, hail, God gives the Egyptians one day's warning to take in their cattle from the field so they won't die. While some Egyptians scoff and leave their cattle outside, others feared God and brought their cattle in, where they could live. (Ex. 9:19-21) It seems that some people learned their lesson the first six times and decided to allow the Israelite God onto their list of deities not to mess with.

2 comments:

James said...

Ex.9:27 And Pharaoh sent, and called for Moses and Aaron, and said unto them, I have sinned this time: the LORD is righteous, and I and my people are wicked.

At this point Pharaoh realized, he is a sinner and not half the god he thought he was. What an admission. In 1Jn.3:4 Whosoever committeth sin transgresseth also the law: for sin is the transgression of the law.

The question is; by what standard is Pharaoh measuring himself by? Was the principles of the Ten Commandments known before it was written down in stone? For instance, both Pharaoh and Abimelech were upset with Abraham, because they knew having another man’s wife was sin and also with Joseph. Gen.12; 20; 39

Both the Hebrews and the Egyptians see by example who the real God is. The hail falls on the Egyptians and not on Israel. Ex.9:25,26. We could say that some of the Egyptians were saved by grace and some of the others, by choice, harden their hearts along with Pharaoh.

enjoy

Jim

Julie said...

The question is; by what standard is Pharaoh measuring himself by? Was the principles of the Ten Commandments known before it was written down in stone?

Even non-Christian cultures have a set of principles and behaviours. The Egyptians were an old society, even at the time of Moses. They had a code of ethics based on their own mythos. I have never yet heard of a culture that condones murder, theft, or rape, for example.

Furthermore, by Ex. 9:27 (the plague of hail), Pharaoh has certainly seen the effects of the Hebrew God, ie: mass destruction of property and possibly lives. To a polytheistic man (which Pharaoh certainly was), it would only make sense to pay heed to such a powerful god.

Julie